The looking glass

In the room, within a room
I saw a glimpse of the outdoors
I heard the whisper of doom
Riding across the moors

Reading du Maurier

In my hand I held a gateway
To the desert world of Fremen
Oh, what a glorious escape
The unthinkable evolution of human

Reading Herbert

In this space of revered silence
Words dance, imagination soars
Wars come alive, decadence
rots from inside walls

Reading Tolstoy

In this mysterious well
Of knowledge, a murder unfolds
Like no other plot, words fell
from each, a story told

Reading Pamuk

In the image that stared back at me
Behold the world I never leave
A new dimension, a new story
A tale many cleverly weave

Reading sanctuary

copyright 2012 © zalina abdul aziz @ ninotaziz
all rights reserved

_______________________________________

For the Magpie Tales.

Any guesses on the titles?

Any guesses why this picture inspired this poem ? I have no idea why, except that it did.

27 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Thank you Laurel. I loved your haunting take. You can read only so much comedy, but give me a tragedy, short or long, and I would be weeping.

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  2. Nice refection through the various authors...

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    Replies
    1. They are often source of inspiration, Tess. Thanks again!

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  3. books were often my gateway to elsewhere growing up...you know....through the looking glass...smiles.

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    Replies
    1. Same here. Thanks Brian for dropping by.

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  4. Nice! Hey, isn't Pamuk a character in "Downton Abbey"?

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    Replies
    1. Glad you liked it, Kat...In Downton Abbey, Pamuk is the Ottoman Empire cultural attaché. The Pamuk I am referring to is the author Pamuk - who hails from Turkey.

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  5. Ninot Ma'am,
    Just a glimpse and these are classics. I can only guess a couple!

    Hank

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  6. Yup, some of my favorites, Sir Hank. Sentimental you!

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  7. Beautifully written words to depict very different writers. When I'm not writing I'm reading and always have a book close by.

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  8. Thank you Renee. Same thing here.

    You are right, classics, science fiction, contemporary and 'roman policiers' are never generally on the same shelf. Another favourite author of mine, Agatha Christie and oh yes, Tanith Lee and Haruki Murakami are not listed.

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  9. "desert world of Fremen", cool, An interior of diverse landscapes

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  10. I don't think I'm as well read as you but it's a ver clever idea. I can only think of Jamaica Inn - if you mean Daphne and not her grandfather George :) The only Tolstoy I read was War and Peace - i made myself do it and I enjoyed it.

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    1. Yes! It is Jamaica Inn. Great job! And War and Peace is a great novel but the word decadence rots in the walls refers to Anna Karenina, my favourite Tolstoy.

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  11. Must admit I picked none of them, but that did not diminish my enjoyment of reading your poem.

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    1. And I enjoy your visit, Stafford. How are you keeping?!

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  12. In the image that stared back at me
    Behold the world I never leave

    I found this an intriguing concept...

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    Replies
    1. That's the way i feel about the stories we read. Glad you connected with the idea.

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  13. Your beautiful post is like a gallory of amazing writers and their words....this is lovely Ninot! :-)

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  14. Thank you carrie! How have you been, dear?

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  15. An excellent original take Nina!

    Anna :o]

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  16. Thanks Anna! Hope you played the guessing game.

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  17. Nice reflection on the classics!

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  18. Thanks Teresa...loved your queen! Temper, temper!

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  19. A wonderful, wonderful post! Love the reflection of the classics...

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